Post-Birthdays in Japan [Article in English and Japanese]

Pretty & Nice’s Holden Lewis (left) and Birthdays’ Samuel Yager (right)

When asked how he ended up touring in Japan without a label’s support, American musician Samuel Yager explains simply, “I have a good friend in the U.S. who’s from Japan and worked with a radio station to get me there.”

Touring on the other side of the world in a very foreign country without a label to organize logistics and act as a helpful guide is no easy feat for any musician, but Yager managed to do it. From April 29 to May 6, Boston, Massachusetts’ act Birthdays played five concerts in Japan. The musician’s rising success in Boston helped make the Japanese tour possible.

When Yager looks back on the trip and the tour, he recalls:

It was surreal. I kept thinking I was going to wake up. Japan is like that movie ‘Demolition Man’ with Wesley Snypes and Sly. The toilets talk and everything is confusing. The people are really nice. Everything looks cooler there. I don’t really know how much I can elaborate on the musician side of tour there. It was soo surreal. I was treated like a real rock star or something. I autographed someone’s sampler, a toy fish, records (that were not Birthdays’), shirts, a shoe. We were in tons of photos.

To not be confused, “Birthdays” is Yager’s solo project he started while living in Saratoga Springs, New York. Before moving to Boston, Yager was bedridden with a blood infection for two months, during which he recorded his first EP, Mating Falls. His music slowly generated attention and when he moved to Boston, he met up with musicians who helped him foster his craft, such as Truman Peyote‘s Caleb Johannes and the FMLY network.

Since getting to the city, he’s released a cassette through Impose Magazines label and a recent 7″ through Firetalk Records, called “Howolding Girls.” The cohesiveness of Boston’s music scene is visible throughout Yager’s work; he’s part of a Lower Allston booking collective called Dreamhouse that hosts handfuls of great shows in the Boston area. The directors of the “Howolding Girls” music video are Boston’s film duo, Nick Curran and Addison Post, and Holden Lewis from Boston’s Pretty & Nice joined Yager on the Japanese tour as his backup guitarist.

The Japanese audience at a Birthdays show

Japan really struck Yager and Lewis as a country that approaches live music in a much different way than the U.S. According to the two musicians, curating shows in Japan is something very special; check-in times for bands are earlier in the day and venues tend to take bands very seriously, with an earnest interest in the band’s sound engineering. The promoters also reliably do their jobs and ensure crowds will be at shows, even when the bands haven’t “made it big” in Japan yet.

Yager adds that there’s also a vast difference in the way fans interact with artists in Japan. “In the U.S. I think people can often be too afraid to lose their shit and get really psyched. I think it’s because of people’s egos. Maybe they’re not comfortable with a huge separation between the performer and audience. This is a big reason why I prefer to play basement shows or at least not on a stage,” he says. “I think the Japanese people are more comfortable with the separation. It doesn’t threaten their egos and they enjoy idolizing an artist or performer. Any night we weren’t playing a show, we were invited to a show. This seemed to be the case everywhere.”

When considering shows elsewhere outside of the U.S., Yager hopes to organize a European tour sometime in the later part of the year, but says he has a lot to figure out first. He’ll be working on new music next year, adding a new member to play drums, electronic percussion and synthesizers, and he also has plans for some U.S. touring, perhaps by bike.

Yager is currently in the runnings to win The Boston Phoenix‘s “best electronic artist” award. He also has a full-length record he recently finished that he plans to self-release in a couple months.

For readers who are visiting Boston looking to experience some of the Boston scene Yager loves, the musicians recommends pizza. But not just any pizza:

“If I didn’t live so close to Peace O’ Pie (an awesome all vegan pizza spot) or date someone who worked there, I wouldn’t have written “Pizza Baby” and I would be way skinnier. Seriously, we have rad food. Especially if you’re vegan like me and many of my friends.”

*

レコード会社付いてないのに、なんで日本でツアーすることになってか聞かれたら、このアメリカ人サミュエル・イェガーは「アメリカにいる日本人の友達がツアーをやらせてもらうためにラジオ放送局と協力した」と軽く答える。

細かく企画してもらったり案内してもらったりするレコード会社がないなら、外国で ツアーするのは誰にでも簡単なことじゃないが、このサム・イェガーはできた。四月の29日から五月の6日まで、アメリカのボストン出身のバースデーズというバンドは五個のコンサートを行っていました。

イェガーが日本のツアーを思い出す時、いろんな面白い話が出て来ます:

夢みたいだったよね。ずっと、そろそろ起きて現実に戻ると思ってたんだ。トイレが喋ったり日本語を喋らない外国人にとっては超混乱させちゃう。日本人は本当優しくてすべての周りがいつもかっこいい。ミュージシャンに対して、実際に日本でツアーする感じをあまり説明できないんだよね。本当のロックスターのように扱われてた。サンプラーとか魚のおもちゃとか俺のバンドじゃないレコードとかシャツとか靴とかいろんな変な物にサインした。そして写真を超撮られてた。

バースデーズはニューヨーク州のサラトガスプリングスに住んでいた間にやっていた、イェガーのバンドでした。ボストンに引っ越す前にイェガーが二か月間病気で、その時にバースデーズのメーティングフォールズと言う初めてのEPを作りました。ボストンに引っ越した後、いろんなローカルアーティストに認められました。

Photo time with fans

その時から音楽雑誌の助けでカセット作ったり、ファイヤートークレコード会社でレコードを作ったりした。ボストンで沢山ライブを行うプローモーショングループに入りイェガーのPVの監督と協力したり、ボストンのプリティーandナイスというバンドのギターリストと日本でツアーしたりして、イェガーの作ってる音楽ではボストンのミュージックシーンの求心力を表現しています。

ライブの扱い方が特にアメリカと違う日本が、イェガーには影響を与えた。イェガーによると、日本はライブするアーティストにとても優しくて、他のツアーをしたことのある所とは違う。アメリカより早く準備してもらったり、音響機器エンジニアーも凄くプロフェショナルでライブするバンドの好みを気にする。主催者も頼もしくて、バンドが日本でまだそんなに人気なくても観客が多いと保証してもらう。

「しかも日本のファン達のアーティストとの対応の仕方も、アメリカとは全く違う」とイェガーが言い続く。

「アメリカだとエゴによって、遠慮せず超盛り上がるファンが少ないよね。パフォーマーとファンの区別を認めるのが好きじゃないんだ。だから舞台でライブするのはいやなんだ。日本人はアメリカ人よりこの区別を認めて、アーティストを崇拝するのが好きな気がする。ライブがない日にも何時も誰かのライブに誘われてた。日本のどこに行ってもそうだったみたい。」

外国でツアーするかと聞かれると、イェガーはヨーロッパで今年の後半に行うつもりと答える。しかし新しい音楽を作ったり、新しいパカッションが上手いメンバーを探したり、アメリカでもツアーしたり、いろんな予定があるので結構企画しなければならない。

今はイェガーがザ・フェニクスというボストンのローカル音楽雑誌のエレクトロニックアーティスト賞を受ける可能性が高いようです。それに最近作り終わったレコードを数ヶ月に発売する予定もあります。

イェガーの好きなボストンを経験したいのならば、彼はピザを勧めます。

「もし俺が超美味いローカルのピザ屋さんのすぐ近くに住んでなかったら、ピザベイビーの歌詞を書けなくて今より細いかもしれないなー。マジでボストンの料理は美味い。超美味い。。。」

*
birthdays.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/bbbirthdaysss

Leave a Reply